Underground Fiberglass Tornado Shelters

Underground Tornado Shelter

Why Fiberglass Tornado Shelters?

Many of us have fond memories of family times in our grandparents' storm shelters that were built back in the early 1900's at the turn of the last century. As we revisit these concrete shelters we see signs of ageing: cracking, mildewing, leaking, etc. It may no longer provide the safety that it once did. In fact, it may now very well be a safety hazard. Old steel shelters suffer from corrosion and rust over the years.

With today's technology and materials fiberglass is the choice for the future. Fiberglass is the preferred material because it offers safety, affordability and longevity, as it is rot resistant, waterproof and can withstand the tests of time.

So, your family can seek protection in "THE REFUGE" for years to come. You can be assured that this shelter will stand the test of time. "THE REFUGE" will be around from the turn of this Century, in the early 2000's, through the next millennium and beyond, providing the same protection from tornado's and damaging winds as it did for you from the day it was installed. There are also three sizes to choose from to better fit your needs.

So, your family can seek protection in "THE REFUGE" for years to come. You can be assured that this shelter will stand the test of time. "THE REFUGE" will be around from the turn of this Century, in the early 2000's, through the next millennium and beyond, providing the same protection from tornado's and damaging winds as it did for you from the day it was installed. There are also three sizes to choose from to better fit your needs.

Fiberglass Storm Shelter

Why Fiberglass?

No Rusting, Cracking, or Rotting.

Easy to Maintain and Clean

Lightweight and Easy to Install

Affordable

Made in USA


FEMA States Over 50% of U.S. at Risk

According to the Federal Emergency Management Agency, over one half of the United States is subject to damaging winds and tornados. The safest place during a tornado is in an underground shelter. Take shelter in "THE REFUGE".

Many of our homes and business's are located in regions prone to damage as noted on the maps that can be accessed at the top of this page. Be prepared for the 2009 hurricane season. Don't risk your family's future.

FEMA Facts

  • Damage paths from tornadoes can be in excess of one mile wide and 50 miles long.
  • Tornadoes can accompany hurricanes and tropical storms as they move onto land.
  • Tornadoes are more likely to occur between 3 pm and 9 pm.
  • DO YOU HAVE A PLACE TO SEEK SHELTER?
Download a brochure in PDF Format

June 4, 2013

Current Grant Program Information:  Please note that the links and contacts listed below are not affiliated with Fiberglass Creations,.Inc. in any way. If there are no grants listed for your area, please check with your county emergency management coordinator or regional council of governments for available funding programs. You may also want to look on the National Storm Shelter Association website for more information.

Brazos Valley Council of Governments - (979) 595-2800
Wichita County, Texas - Kelly Vela, (940) 766-8101
Cooke County, Texas - Ray Fletcher, (940) 668-5400
Grayson County, Texas - Sarah Somers, (903) 813-4217
Fannin County, Texas - Darrell Brewer, (903) 640-8484
West Central Texas Council of Governments - Wendy Patterson, (325) 672-1197 
Tarrant County, Texas - (817) 884-1804
Texas Panhandle Region - Elizabeth True, (806) 372-3381
South Plains Association of Governments - Tommy Murillo, (806) 607-0940
Chickasaw Nation - Terry Davis, (580) 421-8800


News Udpates

May 16, 2013

The REFUGE tornado shelter has recently been feauterd in news stories by KYTX CBS 19, local TV station. Watch the news coverage videos on our Media Coverage page.


June 17, 2011

The REFUGE tornado shelter has recently been feauterd in news stories by KTBS, local TV station. Watch the news coverage videos on our Media Coverage page.


May 25, 2011

The REFUGE tornado shelter has recently been feauterd in news stories by KLTV and KYTX, local TV stations covering the Longview and Tyler, Texas areas. Watch the news coverage videos on our Media Coverage page.


April 18, 2011

With parts of the U.S. still recovering from a destructive and deadly three-day tornado outbreak, a storm system moving from the Rockies to the East Coast may very well spawn another round of tornadoes this week, especially from the Midwest to parts of the Deep South.

There were nearly 250 reported tornadoes last week, with the death toll reaching at least 45 in six states. At least 21 of those deaths were in North Carolina, according to The Associated Press. The first tornadoes hit Thursday in Oklahoma, where two were killed. Officials also reported seven deaths in Arkansas, seven in Alabama, seven in Virginia and one in Mississippi.

The new storm will also produce more late-season snow and flooding as the very stormy April continues across the United States.

The greatest threat for thunderstorms capable of producing wind damage, large hail and tornadoes will be from the Ohio Valley southwestward to the Arkansas-Oklahoma-Texas region from Tuesday into early Wednesday, according to the Storm Prediction Center.